Why IBM’s “Dear Tech” Oscars Ad Is So Enraging

“What I want to know is: Can tech companies sell A.I. without preying on our vulnerabilities and biases?

Commercials for Watson personify the natural language speaking technology as an independent being that can rapidly internalize massive amounts of human expertise that’s embedded in volumes of scientific reports and apply the knowledge to wisely make complex medical recommendations. Debate, however, exists over whether marketing material led medical practitioners to develop unrealistic expectations of what the technology can do, how the technology is programmed, and how hard it would be to set up. Indeed, a few years ago, Cory Doctorow slammed the marketing of Watson for Oncology for being “deceptive.” Frankly, tough questions should be asked about the honesty of the entire tech industry every time a product is depicted as more humanlike than it really is, since anthropomorphism triggers cognitive biases that can get in the way of us seeing things clearly.”

Why IBM’s “Dear Tech” Oscars Ad Is So Enraging
https://slate.com/technology/2019/02/ibm-dear-tech-oscars-ad.html
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Zuckerberg Wants Facebook to Build a Mind-Reading Machine

“Our brains produce enough data to stream 4 HD movies every second. The problem is that the best way we have to get information out into the world—speech—can only transmit about the same amount of data as a 1980s modem. We’re working on a system that will let you type straight from your brain about 5x faster than you can type on your phone today. Eventually, we want to turn it into a wearable technology that can be manufactured at scale. Even a simple yes/no ‘brain click’ would help make things like augmented reality feel much more natural.””

Zuckerberg Wants Facebook to Build a Mind-Reading Machine
https://www.wired.com/story/zuckerberg-wants-facebook-to-build-mind-reading-machine/
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Don’t Fight the Robots. Tax Them.

“And at the same time that the rise of robots shrinks government tax revenue, the fallout from automation will place more demands on government services. The United States will probably need more money to retrain workers bumped from their jobs by automation, to give them a shot at a new one. Welfare rolls could grow, as millions of workers are displaced to the bottom end of the service economy, where wages are low and robots are scarce.”

Don’t Fight the Robots. Tax Them.
https://www.nytimes.com/2019/02/23/sunday-review/tax-artificial-intelligence.html
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[digital heresy] This Is Silicon Valley – OneZero




“In Silicon Valley, few people find things like climate change important enough to talk about at length, and even fewer find it important enough to work on. It’s not where the money is at. It’s not where “success” is at. And it’s certainly not where the industry is at. Instead, money comes from changing a button from green to blue, from making yet another food delivery app, and from getting more clicks on ads. That’s just how the Valley and the tech industry are set up. As Jeffrey Hammerbacher, a former Facebook executive, told Bloomberg, “The best minds of my generation are thinking about how to make people click ads.”

This is Silicon Valley.”

This Is Silicon Valley – OneZero
https://onezero.medium.com/this-is-silicon-valley-3c4583d6e7c2
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Team Human vs. Team AI

“By hiring more people rather than machines, paying them livable wages, and operating with less immediate efficiency, companies could minimize the destruction they leave in their wake. Hiring 10 farmers or nurses may be more expensive in the short run than using one robotic tractor or caregiver, but it may make life better and less costly for everyone over the long term.”

Team Human vs. Team AI
https://www.strategy-business.com/article/Team-Human-vs-Team-AI?gko=4d55d
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The Hidden Automation Agenda of the Davos Elite

“In Davos, executives tend to speak about automation as a natural phenomenon over which they have no control, like hurricanes or heat waves. They claim that if they don’t automate jobs as quickly as possible, their competitors will.

“They will be disrupted if they don’t,” said Katy George, a senior partner at the consulting firm McKinsey & Company.

Automating work is a choice, of course, one made harder by the demands of shareholders, but it is still a choice. And even if some degree of unemployment caused by automation is inevitable, these executives can choose how the gains from automation and A.I. are distributed, and whether to give the excess profits they reap as a result to workers, or hoard it for themselves and their shareholders.”

The Hidden Automation Agenda of the Davos Elite
https://www.nytimes.com/2019/01/25/technology/automation-davos-world-economic-forum.html
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The World Is Choking on Digital Pollution

“The drive for profits and market dominance is instilled in artificial intelligence systems that aren’t wired to ask why. But we aren’t machines; we can ask why. We must confront how these technologies work, and evaluate the consequences and costs for us and other parts of our society. We can question whether the companies’ “solutions”—like increased staffing and technology for content moderation—are good enough, or if they are the digital equivalent of “clean coal.” As the services become less and less separable from the rest of our lives, their effects become ever more pressing social problems.”

The World Is Choking on Digital Pollution
https://washingtonmonthly.com/magazine/january-february-march-2019/the-world-is-choking-on-digital-pollution/
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It's Time for Action on Privacy, Says Apple's CEO Tim Cook

“First, the right to have personal data minimized. Companies should challenge themselves to strip identifying information from customer data or avoid collecting it in the first place. Second, the right to knowledge—to know what data is being collected and why. Third, the right to access. Companies should make it easy for you to access, correct and delete your personal data. And fourth, the right to data security, without which trust is impossible.”

It's Time for Action on Privacy, Says Apple's CEO Tim Cook
http://time.com/collection-post/5502591/tim-cook-data-privacy/
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Why Facebook is giving $300 million for local journalism

“As The Washington Post’s Margaret Sullivan recently wrote, the decline of local reporting has profound consequences for communities and for self-governance. “One problem with losing local coverage is that we never know what we don’t know. Corruption can flourish, taxes can rise, public officials can indulge their worst impulses,” she said. Local reporting can also help establish a foundation of common information, easing polarization and misinformation, owing to high levels of trust that local outlets have with their audiences, she said.”

Why Facebook is giving $300 million for local journalism
https://www.washingtonpost.com/technology/2019/01/15/facebook-pledges-million-local-journalism-projects/
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The Dawn of a New Big Tech Regulatory Era? - Shelly Palmer

“The new normal for the big tech regulatory environment

While they may not face the spectre of an onerous regulatory environment in the near future, the big tech companies do understand the policy landscape has changed. They have to dig into their business processes, find the root cause of their problems, fix them, and demonstrate their change to (re)build public trust. In the current environment, these companies have started moving away from the old position of self-regulation to actively seeking to work with lawmakers in Europe and the US.”

The Dawn of a New Big Tech Regulatory Era? - Shelly Palmer
https://www.shellypalmer.com/2018/12/dawn-new-big-tech-regulatory-era/
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