Review of Technology vs Humanity: The coming clash between man and machine - Ron Immink -

“As Peter Diamandis’ 6Ds, he identified a number of effects.

Dependency – Leaving our thinking to software and algorithms because it’s just so much more convenient and fast.
Confusion – Not knowing if it was the intended human who replied to my emails, or her AI assistant. Or even not knowing if I made my own decision or if I was manipulated by my IDA.
Loss of control – Not having a way of knowing if the AI’s anticipation was correct or not, as we could not possibly track the system’s logic or even comprehend the workings of a quantum computing-fueled, machine-learning system. In other words, we would need to either trust it completely or not at all, similar to the dilemma that some airplane pilots are already facing with their autopilot systems.
Abdication – Being tempted to leave more tasks to systems that would handle them for us, whether it is coordinating personal schedules, making appointments, or answering simple emails. Then, of course, it would be very likely that we would simply blame the cloud/bot/AI if something went wrong.
Reminds me of the “The Seventh Sense“. Do you think AI will let us when it has taken over?”

Technology vs Humanity: The coming clash between man and machine - Ron Immink - Bestselling author, speaker, entrepreneur and ecopreneur.
https://www.ronimmink.com/technology-vs-humanity-coming-clash-man-machine/
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It’s time to rein in the data barons

“Jonathan Taplin, the director emeritus of the Annenberg Innovation Lab at the University of Southern California, argues in Move Fast and Break Things, his book about the power of the internet giants, that rebel artists have long had to deal with “suits” who control distribution of their work. But the rise of companies like Facebook and Amazon has increased the stakes immeasurably. “The concentration of profits in the making of arts and news,” he writes, “has made more than just artists and journalists vulnerable: it has made all those who seek to profit from the free exchange of ideas and culture vulnerable to the power of a small group of …”

It’s time to rein in the data barons
https://www.technologyreview.com/s/611425/its-time-to-rein-in-the-data-barons/
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Steven Pinker’s Ideas About Progress Are Fatally Flawed. These Eight Graphs Show Why.

“Taken together, these graphs illustrate ecological overshoot: the fact that, in the pursuit of material progress, our civilization is consuming the earth’s resources faster than they can be replenished. Overshoot is particularly dangerous because of its relatively slow feedback loops: if your checking account balance approaches zero, you know that if you keep writing checks they will bounce. In overshoot, however, it’s as though our civilization keeps taking out bigger and bigger overdrafts to replenish the account, and then we pretend these funds are income and celebrate our continuing “progress.” In the end, of course, the money runs dry and it’s game over.”

Steven Pinker’s Ideas About Progress Are Fatally Flawed. These Eight Graphs Show Why.
https://patternsofmeaning.com/2018/05/17/steven-pinkers-ideas-about-progress-are-fatally-flawed-these-eight-graphs-show-why/
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Google’s Selfish Ledger is an unsettling vision of Silicon Valley social engineering - watch the video !!

“Building on the ledger idea, the middle section of the video presents a conceptual Resolutions by Google system, in which Google prompts users to select a life goal and then guides them toward it in every interaction they have with their phone. The examples, which would “reflect Google’s values as an organization,” include urging you to try a more environmentally friendly option when hailing an Uber or directing you to buy locally grown produce from Safeway.”

Google’s Selfish Ledger is an unsettling vision of Silicon Valley social engineering
https://www.theverge.com/2018/5/17/17344250/google-x-selfish-ledger-video-data-privacy
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Bill Gates: Global inequality is falling faster than ever

“Now let’s move on to the global picture, and look at the share of global wealth held by the richest 1% - a slightly different measure than the earlier chart, which looked at income inequality. A January 2016 Oxfam report revealed that the richest 1% held over 50% of global wealth – a situation that has become steadily worse over the last five years:


Image: Oxfam

But Bill Gates’ point – which he has made before – is that while incomes at the top of the scale may be rising, overall global inequality is being reduced by the reduction of poverty.

While he is specifically referring to the last 20 years or so, the wider point can be illustrated by taking a longer view. This graphic from Our World in Data shows the progress made in improving the distribution of world income over the last 200 years.”

Bill Gates: Global inequality is falling faster than ever
https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2016/04/bill-gates-global-inequality-is-falling-faster-than-ever/
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The Neighbourhood Where Google Plans to Kill the Private Car

“If Google can hasten the demise of the private car, it would accelerate a shift in corporate power already underway at the top of our economy. Since the advent of car-dependant suburbs like Levittown, the world’s most valuable companies have been oil producers like Exxon, Shell, BP, and Chevron. Today the list is dominated by Apple, Google, Microsoft, Amazon, and Facebook. Google’s parent Alphabet alone is worth $763 billion. “The numbers are staggering,” Gerd Leonhard, a Switzerland-based futurist, speaker and author, recently told me. “Tech is basically much bigger and more powerful than oil has ever been.” Google’s vast financial power comes from ruling the digital realm. Quayside gives it a bridge into our physical world.”

The Neighbourhood Where Google Plans to Kill the Private Car
https://www.vice.com/en_ca/article/a3y59e/the-neighbourhood-where-google-plans-to-kill-the-private-car
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Life in 2030: these are the 4 things experts can't predict. Trust and truth!

“Trust is a social, economic and political binding agent. A vast research literature on trust and social capital documents the connections between trust and well-being, collective problem solving, economic development and social cohesion. Trust is the lifeblood of friendship and care-giving. When trust is absent, all kinds of societal woes unfold, including violence, chaos and paralysing risk-aversion.”

Life in 2030: these are the 4 things experts can't predict
https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2017/11/life-in-2030-what-experts-cant-predict/
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Life in 2030: these are the 4 things experts can't predict

“This explosion of connectivity brings new possibilities, but also economic and social vulnerabilities. The level of coordination and coding required to stitch the Internet of Things together is orders of magnitude more complicated than any historical endeavour yet. It is likely that things will break and no one will know how to fix them. Bad actors will be able to achieve societal disruptions at scale and from afar. Consequently, we are faced with some hard, costly choices. How much redundancy should these complex systems have? How will they be defended and by whom? How is liability redefined, as objects are networked across a global grid and attacks can metastasize quickly?”

Life in 2030: these are the 4 things experts can't predict
https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2017/11/life-in-2030-what-experts-cant-predict/
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What Will Our Society Look Like When Artificial Intelligence Is Everywhere? The view from 2065

“Humans look back at the beginning of the 21st century the way people then looked back at the 18th century: a time of sickness and disaster, where children and loved ones were swept away by diseases. Cholera, lung cancer and river blindness no longer threaten us. By 2065, humans are on the verge of freeing themselves People like Ray Kurzweil, the inventor and author of The Singularity Is Near, are entranced with the idea of living forever. It’s something I’ve always found depressing, but I wouldn’t mind having several lives packed into one. And that seems reachable. “AI won’t lead to immortality, because there will always be accidents,” says Susan Schneider, “but it will lead to extreme life extension.” Of course living longer will be cool only if the world is actually not a hellscape—and if you live in one of the nice parts. “I think [curing diseases] would be wonderful,” she says, “especially if we had cheap energy and were able to end world resource scarcity. I imagine some societies will come closer to achieving that than others.” from the biology that created them.”

What Will Our Society Look Like When Artificial Intelligence Is Everywhere?
https://www.smithsonianmag.com/innovation/artificial-intelligence-future-scenarios-180968403/
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The Paradox of Universal Basic Income: must-read by Joi Ito

“That would be applauded by libertarians and some conservatives, but not by many others.

Underpinning the Silicon Valley argument for UBI is the belief in exponential growth powered by science and technology, as described by Peter Diamandis in his book Abundance: The Future is Better Than You Think. Diamandis contends that technological progress, including gains in health, the power of computing, and the development of machine intelligence, among other things, will lead to a kind of technological transcendence that makes today’s society look like how we view the Dark Ages. He argues that the human mind is unable to intuitively grasp this idea, and so we constantly underestimate long-term effects. If you plot progress out a few decades, Diamandis writes, we end up with unimaginable abundance: “We will soon have the ability to meet and exceed the basic needs of every man, woman, and child on the planet. Abundance for all is within our grasp.” (Technologists often forget is that we actually already have enough food to feed the world; the problem is that it’s just not properly distributed.)

Many tech billionaires think they can have their cake and eat it too, that they are so rich and smart the trickle-down theory can lift the poor out of poverty without anyone or anything suffering. And why shouldn’t they think so? Their companies and their wealth have grown exponentially, and it doesn’t appear as though there is any end in sight, as Marc Andreessen prophetically predicted in his famous essay, “Why Software is Eating the World.” Most of Silicon Valley’s leaders gained their wealth in an exponentially growing market without having to engage in the aggressive tactics that marked the creation of wealth in the past. They feel their businesses inherently “do good,” and that, I believe, allows them to feel more charitable, broadly speaking.”

The Paradox of Universal Basic Income
https://www.wired.com/story/the-paradox-of-universal-basic-income/
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